100 Years Ago: The Amazing Technology of 1910


I found this very interesting article in Yahoo! News and thought of sharing it with all of you.

Heather Whipps
Special to LiveScience
LiveScience.com Heather Whipps
special To Livescience
livescience.com
Fri Jan 1, 11:05 am ET


The dawn of 2010 promises more amazing developments in the world of technology. Already, tourists can visit space, for a price, nearly everything and everyone is going digital, and medical science continues to test the boundaries of what makes us truly human. One full century ago, the new technologies that had people talking were considered just as groundbreaking. Electricity led the charge of developments that were changing the way people lived every day, with transportation and chemistry not far behind. As the clocks of 1909 ticked towards 1910, more exciting inventions were just around the corner.

The first decade of the 1900s was an exciting time to be alive, with inventors continuing to make major strides in all disciplines.
The early years of the century saw the general public finally able to enjoy the fruits of what was achieved in electrical engineering during the previous century. By 1910, many suburban homes had been wired up with power and new electric gadgets were being patented with fervor. Vacuum cleaners and washing machines had just become commercially available, though were still too expensive for many middle-class families. The telephone was another hot new commodity in 1910, with millions of American homes already connected by manual switchboard. Those who did not have a phone to call their neighbor still had to rely on the paper for their news, however; though radio technology was in its infancy, regular broadcasts were still several years away. In transportation, those first years of the 20th century began the age of the airship, marked by a craze for dirigibles such as the Zeppelin and the Wright Brothers’ historic flight at Kitty Hawk in 1903. Henry Ford introduced his landmark Model T in 1908, making automobiles available and affordable to the masses for the first time.
Chemistry also charged full steam ahead in 1910. Advances in the use of gases chilled the world out with the release of the first electric refrigerators and air-conditioning units, while French inventor Georges Claude harnessed neon in glass tubes and debuted neon lighting in Paris, changing the face of seedy advertising forever. Other new inventions, both influential and inane, that were making waves one century ago included:
  • Bakelite plastic
  • Escalators
  • Teabags

  • Cellophane

  • Instant coffee

  • Disposable razor blades
The best thing before sliced bread. The world was modernizing quickly by 1910, but some everyday things we take for granted now were then still just a glimmer in their inventors’ eyes. Men were still relying on buttons and women on painful corsets until 1913, for example, when clothing technology got a boost with the development of the zipper and modern brassiere. Unfortunate zipper accidents likely healed better with the invention of the modern Band-Aid, which came about seven years later. Steel turned rusty until mid-decade, when the stainless variety ushered in a new era of efficient gun barrels and, later, shiny appliances. Finally, though the pop-up toaster first hit the market in 1919, the public had to wait almost ten years for its practicality to be fully realized. The “greatest thing” of the modern age, the one invention against which all others are now compared-sliced bread-was born in Missouri in 1928.

We’re just so modernised now that it sounds funny that once a person invented sliced bread and teabags. I guess in another hundred years, computers are no longer thought as an invention but as a daily need.

A Ring Around The Moon!


I came across this article from Yahoo! buzz and I wish to share it with all of you.  Apparently on the 1st December, 2009 (two days ago) some people managed to see a ring surrounding the moon. Here is what I read from the article:

Surrounded by trees and a building, the moonlight forms a ring over Macedonia's capital Skopje, in this photo. This sight occurs when high thin clouds (cirrus) containing millions of tiny ice crystals cover much of the sky. Each ice crystal acts like a miniature lens. Because most of the crystals have a similar elongated hexagonal shape, light entering one crystal face and exiting through the opposing face refracts 22 degrees, which corresponds to the radius of the Moon Halo.

Many folks who looked up at the sky last night were greeted with a very bizarre sight: a luminous ring surrounding the moon. Were aliens coming? Was the end of the world at hand? Fortunately, no.

Though it looked ominous, the shiny ring around the moon last night was actually a rather common weather phenomenon. According to various weather-related blogs across the Buzz, this ring around the moon occurs when thin cirrus clouds, which contain ice crystals, refract the moonlight. A blog from the Goddard Space Flight Center explains that “the shape of the ice crystals results in a focusing of the light into a ring. Since the ice crystals typically have the same shape, namely a hexagonal shape, the Moon ring is always the same size.”

Of course, in the moment, many sky watchers didn’t know what the heck was going on, and the resulting avalanche of Web searches reflects their confusion. Queries on “ring around the moon,” “why is there a ring around the moon,” and “ring around moon pictures” all soared into the stratosphere. A news station in Cincinnati reported that they received calls from curious watchers.

Some folks say that if you count the number of stars within the ring, it’ll let you know how many days until the next snowfall. Space.com doesn’t confirm that tall tale, but it does explain that a ring around the moon in warm-weather months “usually foretells…a long, slow rain [that] should eventually arrive in about 12 to 18 hours.”

But hey, even if nothing happens afterward, a ring around the moon is still cool to look at any time of the year.

How I wish I was able to see it. I just hope that one day I might come across something as beautiful as this glowing ringed moon!