Trengganuspeak (3)


A year ago I would be stunned if somebody were to tell me that I’m going to write on the subject of Trengganuspeak as I know almost nothing about it (please refer to ‘Solo Bolo’). It was Uncle AG‘s (Awang Goneng) GUIT (Growing Up In Trengganu) that started my interest to learn Trengganuspeak. Thank you again Uncle AG – you are a great sifu. Or is it siput in Trengganuspeak as Pok Chang Siput (in GUIT: pg 203)? (refer to ‘A New Trengganuspeak Word From Awang Goneng’)

How true it is that spelling words in Trengganuspeak is really challenging even for Terengganu folks in Terengganu. As for me; even to pronounce the words are challenging enough. Just now my little brother Ahmad Ali asked for his vitamin in English. I corrected his pronunciation and dad teasingly corrected mine to ‘bitameng’ (that means vitamin in Trengganuspeak). Upon hearing ‘bitameng’ mum asked, “Isn’t it ‘bitaming’?” Dad said it is ‘bitameng’ and left my mum puzzled…

That brings me back to ‘kerejong’ or ‘kherjong’ (refer to ‘A New Trengganuspeak Word From Awang Goneng’). When I first saw it in ‘Kecek-Kecek’, I thought it meant ‘keras’ (hard). But mum said that ‘kherjong’ got nothing to do with ‘keras’. The word that explain the state of ‘keras’ (hard) is ‘khejong’ – ‘kerah khejong’. Mum later explained that apart from ‘kerah khejong’, there is also ‘kerah ccokkeng’. ‘Kerah khejong’ refers to the feel of hardness or very chewy (for food). For example if one bite into a cold leftover fried keropok lekor; especially the ones sold in KL; one would say, “‘Kerah khejong’ doh khepok leko ning” (The keropok lekor had turned very chewy).

On the other hand, ‘kerah ccokkeng’ refers to the ‘visual’ state of hardness or may even be fresh in food. Mum gave an example of a sentence she used to hear, “‘Kerah ccokkeng’ ikang (fish) ni”.

Until now I guess I’m still confused and could not distinguish the meanings ‘khejong’ and ‘ccokkeng’ for they are too confusing and difficult. Worst , I may end up getting confuse of ‘kherjong’/’kerejong’ (straitjacket) and ‘khejong’ as in ‘kerah khejong’. So now, I’m getting more and more confused than I used to be.

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A New Trengganuspeak Word From Awang Goneng


[this is the revised comment as posted at Uncle Awang Goneng’s blog]

Wow Uncle AG, that is another new Trengganuspeak word for me to learn. Neither my parents had ever mentioned it to me before.

I have been “trying” to write some notes about Trengganuspeak too at my blog: Trengganuspeak and Trengganuspeak (2).

But definitely not to challenge the “sifu”. By that, hopefully you will not be mistakenly called “Awang Goneng Siput” as in Pok Chang Siput (your “Snapshots to the Past” that mentioned about my ancestor’s [Pok Loh] migration from China).

All my sibling enjoyed the several meetings we had especially when you came to visit our Atuk and Nenek and later during the GUiT launching at our Keda Pok Loh (Alam Akademik).

Photo 1: Showing Uncle AG the Dewan Pelajar (Disember 2006) which featured me on the cover. Sharing the moment were my siblings and Atuk.

Photo 2: Group photo after GUiT lauching at my Nenek’s Alam Akademik (Keda Pok Loh). Pok Loh’s sole surviving son (my great grandfather) is between Uncle AG and Auntie Zaharah (Kak Teh)

Note: But my dad just commented that he use “kherjong” instead of “kerejong” [I don’t know how to do the “umlaud” as you did]. And I thought it was “khejong” as in “kerah khejong” but as it happen, kerejong has nothing to do with khejong. That is how difficult and confusing Trengganuspeak is (to me).