Preparing Ttupak Pulok (Ketupat Daun Palas)

Throughout the last day of Ramadhan, our small kitchen was cramped with food and all of us were suddenly upgraded into ‘chefs of the day’. My little sister Aeshah baked trays of lovely cupcakes. At the other end of the kitchen, while singing at the top of her voice, Anisah helped my mother who was cooking rendang and kuah kacang, driving my mom quite mad. Even little Ali sat cross-legged on his chair, weaving kelongsong ketupat nasi for me to fill in with rice later. Usually, I would be preparing the ketupat nasi and weave most of the kelongsongs; but this Eid was special. For the first time, I made the true Terengganu ‘ttupak pulok’ instead!

Ketupat

Ttupak pulok‘, which is also known as  ‘ketupat daun palas’ in standard Malay, is a type of glutinous rice delicacy, steamed with coconut milk and wrapped in a special leaf named ‘daun palas’ before it is fried to perfection. Since it is so easy to get them in Kuala Terengganu where my parents came from, neither my mother nor my grandmothers know how to prepare them. To quote what my great grandmother told my mom when asked for the recipe, “Bakpe nok belajor sangak. Buak nyussoh je. Ppasor blambok, beli je senang.” “Why bother? You can buy loads of them from the market.”

However, living in Kuala Lumpur, we do not have the luxury of having those authentic Terengganu’s ‘ttupak pulok’ sold in markets or farmer’s markets around our place. It is not that nobody sells ketupat palas here, but the tasty, rich and firm textured Terengganu’s ‘ttupak pulok’ is none to be seen. And since we are unable to return to Terengganu for Eid due to my father’s tight schedule, my mother announced that she’ll be making her own ‘ttupak pulok’, which happens to be one of her favourite foods.

And imagine my mother’s delight a few weeks before Eid, when she caught the sight of daun palas being sold at the Pasar Tani (or the farmer’s market)!

Daun Palas

Daun Palas

“But mama, you said that you have never weaved a ‘ttupak pulok’ before,” I reminded her.

“No problem. We can always surf the internet for instructions later!” she exclaimed, her eyes sparkling with excitement.

So we spent the afternoon in front of our computer, our oily hands fragrant with coconut milk and sticky with glutinous rice as we tried again and again for a decent wrap. We had a great time and good laughs, mom squeezed most of her rice out of the wrap while I tore almost all of my leaves into half! It seems that while weaving a ketupat nasi looks harder than it actually is, it is the total opposite for ‘ttupak pulok” at least until one masters the technique. It took us a while to get to the hang of it but it was definitely worth it. In the end, we managed to come up with a batch of handsomely wrapped ‘ttupak puloks’. To speed up the process, while my mother was busy in the kitchen, I made a few ‘monster-sized’ ‘ttupak pulok’, which earned a stern warning from my mom, “That is a monster, not a ttupak, never, ever do that again”.

My mom took the ketupat to the kitchen and fried them to perfection. And the taste? They were so delicious, they tasted exactly like the good ol’ Terengganu’s ‘ttupak pulok’ which my mother missed so much. In fact, they tasted even better than some of those that we bought in Kuala Terengganu. Even my father was so impressed with the result that he suggested that we make should make ‘ttupak pulok’ to share with our close relatives and friends who happens to miss the delicious delicacy as much as we do for the Eid.

Ttupak pulok

It’s funny and ironic when you think of how modern technology is able to preserve the traditional cooking methods and recipes despite it also influences a lot of people to leave their traditional and healthier way of cooking and eating. With the invention of instant ‘plastic ketupat’, almost all of my parent’s friends prepare their ketupats the easier way, despite the hazard it poses to their health. However without the help of the world wide web, neither my mom nor I would be able to enjoy the true Terengganu ‘ttupak pulok’ made from scratch in our own kitchen in Kuala Lumpur!

A Map of Trengganu

Uncle Awang Goneng’s latest book, A Map of Trengganu is finally out! This morning, I went out with my father to pick up the books from the country distributor and helped dad with our first batch of deliveries.

I've got my copy... Have you got yours?

Anxious to be one of the first people to read it, I quickly picked up a copy from the box as soon as we reached home. Soon, I was too engrossed with the book that when my mother called me to help her with the chores, she was shocked to hear me laughing alone. At that very moment, I was reading the part when Awang Goneng ‘took a Law degree “from the Academic Registrar’s office one night when the door was left open”.

‘A Map of Trengganu’ proved to be as beautiful and fun as its prequel ‘Growing Up In Trengganu’. Since the book had just arrived from Singapore, (as for today) there is a big chance that you may not be able to get them from the bookshops in Malaysia yet. But you can calm those restless, fluttering butterflies in your stomach by ordering them straight from ‘The Pizzaman’ (who happens to be my father 🙂 )!

You can contact him by email (akarimomar@yahoo.com) or call/SMS 019-319-9788. You can check out his blog post on the book here!. And what’s more? He can send it straight to your doorsteps (which is why he was called ‘The Pizzaman’). Do not miss the chance and get your copy NOW

Anyway, right after I’ve published this post, I’ll be going back to my room where I shall not be disturbed (nor shall I scare mum with my constant outburst) and continue reading the book 🙂

An evening at Pantai Rhu Sepuloh… With Uncle Nisar!

We took a trip to Kuala Terengganu on 24th of December, 2010 together with Uncle Nisar. That was his first trip to the east coast of West Malaysia and we were very excited to take him around our hometown.

On the evening of the 26th of December, we went to Pantai Rhu Sepuloh (Rhu Sepuloh Beach – near Bari). According to Uncle Fauzan who is my father’s good friend, there is a special place at the beach where we can buy fresh fishes and other seafood along the beach.

Walking along the sandy beach

After buying some fresh fishes and some tasty big prawns, dad drove us to a stall selling delicious ‘ikang celuk ttepung’ served with ‘air lada’ for tea. Of course they do have other food in their menu but the ‘ikang celuk ttepung’ is probably their most popular dish since their fishes were freshly caught. We also had some prawns, squids and fried noodle. The seafood were so fresh and tasty and not like the ones that we usually buy from the markets. After that we each had a refreshing glass of coconut drink.

Enjoying our ikang celuk ttepung

After tea, we took a walk along the beautiful sandy beach. We found a shipwreck and mum suggested that it may be Captain Jack Sparrow’s ship, ‘The Black Pearl’. Uncle Nisar told us that Captain Jack Sparrow was so popular in the USA that people would dress up as the captain to the cinema to watch the movie!

Is this all that is left of The Black Pearl?

Then we came to an area where the fishermen dock their boats. We met a fisherman who showed us some fish traps. I still could not figure out how the trap works; I really hope that Uncle Azahar can help me 😉

We went to see the fishing boats

Examining a fish trap

Finally we walked back to the car and started our journey back home.

“A Moment With English – Enjoying English” @ SK Padang Hiliran

Last Sunday, Alam Akademik Sdn. Bhd. (my grandmother’s bookstore which is also known as Keda Pok Loh Yunang) organized a program at Sekolah Kebangsaan Padang Hiliran in Kuala Terengganu. The program started at 9 a.m. and ended at 11.20 a.m. It was held at the school hall. The program was attended by students from Year 3,4,5 and 6.

The kids listening to our little presentations

The kids listening to our little presentations

We hope to share our experiences in Public Speaking with all of our friends at Sekolah Kebangsaan Padang Hiliran. We had a real good time at the school. The students are really brave and smart. They came forward to read and answer questions. I’m so proud of them. We hope our friends in Sekolah Kebangsaan Padang Hiliran will enjoy learning English for we need to learn other languages to be smart and knowledgeable.

Syazaliana, the first person brave enough to raise up her hand

Syazaliana, the first person brave enough to raise up her hand.

I did a book reading and spoke about ‘The Creation Of Universe’ based on the book by the same tittle written by Prof Muhammad Al-Mahdi. I read a chapter of Growing Up In Terengganu by Awang Goneng titled ‘Budu Spell’ which is very interesting and funny at the same time. My little sister Aeshah did what she does best… STORYTELLING!!! And Anisah sang a butterfly song. My little blogging brother Ahmad Ali, read a post from his famous blog entitled ‘Swine Flu’.

A photo of me delivering my speech

A photo of me delivering my speech

We ended the program by singing the Khalifah Song and Guantanamera. Guantanamera is the most popular song in Cuba and is an unofficial national anthem of Cuba. This Spanish Song is so beautiful and I can never be tired of hearing it.

The Sandpipers singing Guantanamera

The Sandpipers singing Guantanamera

I really had a good time too. I hope we can inspire them to learn English and other languages and be good oriaters… I wish to thank the headmaster and the teachers for inviting us to the school and for the token given to us by the school. I would also like to thank Syaza and all those from SK Padang Hiliran who had been reading my blog.

My little brother, Ahmad Ali, made new friends at the school. The girl in the middle (beside the boy) is Syazaliana. Perhaps she would name the rest of her friends for me...

My little brother, Ahmad Ali, made new friends at the school. The second boy is Izzat. The other two boys beside him are from Year 4 (if anyone know their names please inform me). The girls from left are Syazaliana, Hazirah, Adlin and Puteri. The boy in front... I don't think I need to tell you but just in case, AHMAD ALI himself!

Meeting The ‘Grandma Bloggers’

aiman-cubee-emy

Tok Cu Bee (left), Aunty Emy (middle) and me enjoying our time together.

Guess what happened this morning? I met Aunty Emy and Tok Cu Bee! Yes, that’s right… seven bloggers (dad, Aeshah, Anisah, Ali, Aunty Emy a.k.a. Royaltlady, Tok Cu Bee a.k.a. Bebee and me) met at Shukur’s Nasi Dagang Stall. Not that we met coincidentally (like how Uncle Azahar met me) but we had planned this meeting the night before. There were also two non-bloggers at the unofficial bloggers meeting; mum and Uncle Syed Mohd Zaid who works as a MAS pilot.

Uncle Syed (left- beside dad) telling us a joke while eating his Nasi Dagang

Uncle Syed (left- beside dad) telling us a joke while eating his Nasi Dagang

Aunty Emy is actually our relative and so is Tok Cu Bee. Aunty Emy and Tok Cu Bee called themselves ‘Grandma Bloggers’ as they both are grandmothers. Tok Cu Bee told us that she was inspired by Awang Goneng to start her blog (La Vie En Rose) and so was Aunty Emy (Royaltlady). Aunty Emy started hers on her birthday in December 2007. By the way, Aunty Emy was Uncle Azahar’s classmate in year 6 many years ago. Uncle Azahar is another blogger friend of ours whose wonderful blog is Nature Lover.

aiman-auntyemy

As we enjoyed our breakfast, we talked about all sorts of things. Uncle Syed explained how did the FedEx plane crashed in Tokyo a few months ago. There was strong wind at the time the plane was landing and the wind was blowing from the sides of the plane. As the plane tried to land, it bounced back and one of the wings grazed against the runway before bursting into a fireball which killed both the pilot and the co-pilot.

At about eleven, we decided to break up after spending more than two hours at the stall. I really enjoyed the meeting and I hope that there will be more bloggers meetings; perhaps with even more bloggers to make it even more exciting. Aunty Emy, Tok Cu Bee and Uncle Syed were really wonderful and I am looking forward to see them again; as we say in Trengganuspeak, ‘Dok sabor doh nok ttemu mata lagi!’

Going Back To Terengganu (Balik Kampung)

Starting my own blog taught me lots of new things. For instance during our journey back to Kuala Terengganu, I was more alert to the surroundings – taking notes and photos for my blog. Normally I would just sleep, watching the VCDs or lost in my own world.

There are lots of beautiful old traditional houses by the main road in Kemaman. I took photos of them wondering how much longer they would be standing there. I guess one day those houses will be replaced by modern shop houses or other buildings considering their strategic locations. I can’t blame their owners for destroying our heritage for the old houses are of no commercial value compared to the modern buildings.

We passed some beautiful rivers and scenic beaches. Born and grew up in Kuala Lumpur, far away from the beach my siblings and I are always excited to see beaches. How I wish that we can stop by at those beautiful beaches…

‘Amlr’ mentioned about a Pasar Ramadhan in Geliga where one can buy ‘ttupak sutong’ (please refer to ‘Ttupak Sutong’). Passing Geliga, I tried to look for the location but failed to locate the Pasar Ramadhan. Maybe it is not located near the main roads to Kuala Terengganu or maybe we were there too early as we passed Geliga at about 1p.m.

Reaching the Petronas Complex, my little 5 years old blogging brother, Ahmad Ali excitedly searched for the fire at the refinery complex. He just love counting them and searching for the biggest fire. He too was searching for things to write in his blog (which he posted on 27th Sept, entittled ‘Things I saw on the way to Terengganu’). He kept telling us that he wish to own  a real camera or a real phone with a camera so that he can take lots of photos of the things he likes by himself.

I passed the ‘Keda Lepeng’ in Rusila – another place that sells ‘ttupak sutong’ according to ‘changgeh’ (please refer to ‘Ttupak Sutong – 1st comment). And yes, I can see the words ‘ttupak sutong’ written big and clear on their banner. The place looked empty. I guess they are still closed as most restaurants starts operating their business late in the afternoon during Ramadhan.

Breaking fast (iftar) in Kuala Terengganu is exciting. I waited for the sound of the ‘bedil’ (please refer to ‘Special Ramadhan Treats from Terengganu’) to mark the time for iftar. And finally I ate the delicious ‘ttupak pulok‘ with ‘samba daging’/serunding daging’ or beef floss for iftar today. How I missed the delicious ‘ttupak pulok’ (as I wrote in ‘Ttupak Pulok‘). Mum enjoyed her ‘ttupak pulok’ with ‘ayang golek’. And talking about ‘ayang golek’ reminds me of the old fashioned ‘ayang golek’ on sugar cane sticks (as mentioned by ‘Pok Cik Luckganu’ in ‘Special Ramadhan Treats from Terengganu’). How I wish I can try them…

Note: Where do they fire the bedil? I’ll be writing about it in my next post, Insya Allah.

Ttupak Pulok (ketupat pulut)

The tasty ttupak pulok

The tasty ttupak pulok

The other day mum asked if I want to eat rendang… Rendang reminds me of ttupak pulok and no ttupak pulok  tastes as good as the ones from Kuala Terengganu. Ttupak pulok is a type of glutinous rice delicacy, steamed with coconut milk and wrapped in a special leaf before it is fried to perfection.

I’ve tried the ones sold in KL but none can match the tasty ttupak pulok of Kuala Terengganu. As I always wrote in my blog, the Terengganu folks love to eat fish and we eat fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Well, we do not use fish to make ttupak pulok but we eat ttupak pulok with grilled fish. Ttupak pulok is also tasty when eaten with rending ( a spicy beef / chicken dish) or samba ayang or daging/serunding in standardspeak (chicken or beef floss – another meat recipe). In fact ‘ttupak pulok’ is even tasty on its own especially when eaten fresh from the wok.

To make ‘ttupak pulok’ we first steam the rice. Half way through, add the thick coconut milk and salt. Next, continue steaming the rice until cooked. Then comes the tricky part – to wrap the steamed glutinous rice in special leaves. Too bad I do not master the art of wrapping the ttupak pulok neither did mum nor nenek. If the wrapping process is not done properly, the ttupak will be too soft and maybe too oily after it is fried. The final step is the easiest – fry the wrapped ttupak in hot oil and the ttupak is ready to be served with grilled fish, rendang or ‘samba daging’. How I wish that I can have them… But it always took me much longer than mum to unwrap the ttupak! Not only do we need a lot of practise to enable us to wrap the ttupak pulok, but we also need to learn how to unwrap it before eating the tasty ttupak pulok. But once you try them….you won’t mind the hassle of unwrapping them.

Ttupak Sutong

A few days ago, mum cooked a very delicious ‘ttupak sotong’  for iftar. ‘Ttuppak sutong or ‘ketupat sotong’ in standardspeak is squids stuffed with steamed glutinous rice in coconut milk curry sauce. The picture of the gleaming white squids floating in a white sea of  coconut milk is as appealing to the eyes as it is to the palate. And the delightful fragrant of the ‘ttupak sotong’ brewing on the stove really made me yearning to have a sip of that creamy white curry sauce right at that very moment.

yummy ttupak sutong

yummy ttupak sutongThis Terengganu specialty is normally a home cooked treat. In fact my family and I have never come across any eatery serving or selling ‘ttupak sotong’ each time we were back in Kuala Terengganu. But again I might be wrong for we do not live there. Anyway dad said that he used to buy ‘ttupak sotong’ during his schooling years. May be nowadays it is only a special home cooked treat.

Everyone in my family loves the ‘ttupak sotong’ except my dear sister Aeshah. Just imagine the delightful taste of tender squid stuffed with soft steamed glutinous rice in an aromatic, delicious and creamy coconut milk curry sauce… This is the taste that my 5 years old little (blogging) brother Ahmad Ali (refer to ‘Ahmad Ali’) would described as mmmmm… as he always did in his blog* when he wrote about the taste of the food that he loves.

To make ‘ttupak sotong’ we first need to buy a lot of fresh ‘sutong’ or squids of a medium size . Try to look for the ones with egg for a tastier ‘ttuppak sutong’ .Next, steam the glutinous rice with some coconut milk. While waiting for the glutinous rice to be cooked, clean the squids and take out the outer layer skin leaving them gleaming white. Then, stuff the squids with the steamed glutinous rice and secure the open end using toothpicks. In a big pot (if cooking a lot of ‘ttupak sutong’!), heat the coconut milk or low fat milk. Add sliced shallots, ginger and some fenugreek and continue cooking on a medium heat. Next add the stuffed squids. Do not overcook or the squids will end up too chewy. The curry sauce should has the right balance of salt, sugar and the creamy taste of either coconut milk or low fat milk. Actually this is the most tricky part as one has to be   very familiar with the taste of the original ‘ttupak sutong’ to enable them to get it right and be able to produce a really delicious ‘ttupak sutong’.

It would be nice if I can have my ‘ttupak sutong’ more often but mum will only cook ‘ttupak sutong’ if she can get squids heavy with eggs which is nenek’s (my grandma) important secret in cooking her finger licking good ‘ttuppak sutong’. Don’t worry if there are left overs- they taste as good after a few day in the refrigerator or store them in the freezer if they are to be eaten much later. The squids’ heads can be fried or cooked in other recipeas prefered.

Special Ramadhan treats from Terengganu

The tasty Jala Mas. BTW the yellow colour comes 100% from the egg yolks. NO artificial colouring added.

The tasty Jala Mas. BTW the yellow colour comes 100% from the egg yolks. NO artificial colouring added.

Reading Awang Goneng’s post ‘The Sound of Heavy Metal’, reminds me of fasting and iftar in Kuala Terengganu. So it seems like Uncle Awang Goneng misses the ‘bubur lambuk’, ‘blede kerah’ and ‘akok’.

Iftar and imsak in Kuala Terengganu is marked by the sound of the ‘bede’(cannon shot) The best part is there will be two ‘bede’ for imsak. The first is a warning – to remind us to drink our last glass of ‘air nyo’ (young coconut drink) or to take the last bite of ‘akok’ (a type of sweet cake) before the sound of the final ‘bede’ that tells us to stop drinking and eating.

Ramadhan in Terengganu means an annual “Traditional Terengganu Food Fest”. This is the time of the year when I can see and taste the unfamiliar or hard to get ‘kueh’ (sweet/savoury traditional cakes) and dishes. The good part is, most of the traditonal Terengganu ‘kueh’ are free from artificial colouring, flavouring and also trans fat (refer to ‘Food Facts’). The main ingredients in our exotic sweet cakes such as ‘jala mas’ (jala mah), ’emas sejemput’ (mah jjeput), ‘pauh dilayang’ (pauh llayang), ‘bunga tanjong’, ‘akok’, ‘nganang’, ‘nekbak’,’ taik itek’, ‘skaye’, ‘puding telor’, and ‘tok aji serbang’ are eggs and sugar.

The delicious tok aji serbang.

The sweet and creamy Tok Aji Serbang. The brown colour came solely from palm sugar and contains NO ARTIFICIAL COLOURING

As in other parts of West Malaysia, the most special food in Ramadhan is the ‘bubur lambuk’. But unlike the ‘bubur lambuk’ in Kuala Lumpur (please refer to ‘Bubur Lambuk Kampung Baru’) the main ingredients in our ‘Terengganu Bubur Lambuk’ are fish, herbs, sweet potato, special local vegetables, crushed black pepper and of course ‘budu’ (please refer to ‘Ikang Singgang’). In fact, our ‘bubur lambuk’ does not tasted or even looked like ‘Bubur Lambuk Kampung Baru’ at all – their only similarity is that- both are special Ramadhan porridge sharing the same name.

Unlike ‘Bubur Lambuk Kampung Baru’ which uses a lot of aromatic spices such as cloves, star anise, cinnamon, etc… the only spice used in our ‘Terengganu Bubur Lambuk’ is crushed black pepper. Nowadays prawn, squid and other seafood are added but fish is a must (use more fish for a tastier ‘bubur lambuk’). But sad to say, I do not really enjoy the rather ‘strong’ taste of our ‘Terengganu Bubur Lambuk’; instead I prefer the ‘Bubur Lambuk Kampung Baru’.

Another special treat is the finger licking good ‘ayam golek’. For this tasty dish, the chicken is barbequed using a special creamy sauce that gives the ‘ayam golek’ its delicious taste and the mouth watering aroma. Next come ‘pulut lepa’, ‘sata’ and mum’s favourite ‘paih ikang’. Anyway the size of the fish or ‘ikang’ in the ‘paih’ is too small for me to enjoy them. Nenek and mum used to say that the size of the fish seems to be getting smaller and smaller year after year. Any way I can’t remember mum telling me about eating ‘Ceranang Mok Mek’ in Ramadhan… ‘Ceranang’ is a very tasty Terengganu salad and ‘ceranang Mok Mek’ was said to be the most popular ‘ceranang eatery’ in Kuala Terengganu and according to luckganu (please refer to luckganu’s comment). ‘Mok Mek’ also sells tasty ‘kerepok leko ikang yu’.

Fish is the important ingredient in most of Terengganu savoury ‘kueh’ as in ‘Pulok lepe’, ‘bekang kuoh puteh’, ‘sata’, ‘paong goreng’, ‘karipak ikang’ etc. ‘Orang Tranung berahi makang ikang, dok?’ (Guess the Terengganu folks love to eat fish). And by the way, two days ago we had ‘pulok gao nyo’ with grilled fish (refer to ‘Delicious pulok’) for iftar…’sedak sungguh’ (so delicious).

The yummy mah jjeput.

The yummy mah jjeput. Like the jala mas, it contains NO ARTIFICIAL COLOURING

Lakse Kuoh Masok

On Sunday, we had a very delicious ‘lakse kuoh masok’ (laksa kuah masak) for dinner at nenek’s place. ‘Lakse kuoh masok’ is a type of rice noodle (lakse) dish served with a spicy fish curry sauce (kuoh masok) and fresh raw vegetables called ‘ulang’ (ulam in standard speak). In Terengganu, we have two types of laksa dishes – ‘lakse kuoh masok’ (rice noodle in cooked fish curry sauce) and ‘lakse kuoh metoh’ (rice noodle in uncooked fish curry sauce. ‘Lakse kuoh masok’ is also known as ‘lakse kuoh meroh’ while ‘lakse kuoh metoh’ is also known as ‘lakse kuoh puteh’ due to the colours of their fish curry sauces.

The delicious ‘lakse kuoh masok’ that we enjoyed that evening was specially brought by Pak Cik Hisham who works in nenek’s bookstore, Alam Akademik in Kuala Terengganu. The ‘kuoh’ (fish curry sauce) was cooked by Pak Cik Hisham’s mother. She must be a very good cook for the ‘kuoh’ is very tasty. According to nenek, it is not easy to prepare a very tasty ‘kuoh masok’ for in cooking Terengganu traditional dishes, the amount of ingredients used for a recipe is just ‘agok-agok’ or about ‘a certain amount’- so one needs a lot of practice to master the recipe.

Even the laksa (rice noodle) is brought from Terengganu. In KL, mum uses the dried laksa because the kind of fresh laksa sold in KL tastes very differently from the ones sold in Terengganu. Of course the fresh laksa or ‘lakse kebok’ is much tastier than the dried laksa especially the one that Pak Cik Hisham brought to KL. Nenek said that Pak Cik Hisham’s ‘lakse’ was of high quality and stayed soft and fresh even after two days outside the refrigerator.

Preparing a traditional ‘lakse kuoh masok’ is rather tedious especially when the types of fish suitable for the fish curry sauce are quite bony. First we have to boil the fish and debone them. The process is tricky as we have to look out for fine fish bones. Then mash the fish using a mortar and pestle until smooth. Cook the fish in coconut milk together with shrimp paste, chili paste, asam, shallots, garlic, ginger and other spices and herbs on slow fire for at least four hours for a tasty ‘kuoh masok’.

For the vegetables, traditionally we use brinjals, cucumbers, bean sprouts, fresh basil leaves, cashew shoots, long beans and kesomleaves or polygonum. Slice (very fine) all the vegetables except brinjals and cucumbers that should be cut into fine cubes. Anyway for the modern version of ‘lakse kuoh masok’, any ulam (salad) such as pegaga, ulam raja, etc can be used instead of the vegetables mentioned above but the basil and kesom (polygonum) leaves are a must. If using the dried laksa, boil the laksa until soft, then rinse them in cold water. Please do not use the KL version of fresh laksa for it does not taste like the Terengganu ‘lakse at all. Serve the ‘lakse’ (lakse kebok’ if possible) with ‘kuoh‘, vegetables, slices of hard boiled eggs, lime and some shrimp paste and chili paste for an extra delicious ‘lakse kuoh masok‘. ‘Pok Cik Shang‘, thank you very much for the delicious lakse – we really enjoyed the ‘akok’ and egg tarts too.’Sedak sunggoh kuoh lakse mok Pok Cik Shang. Rase macang nok lagi je’.