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Archive for the ‘Phenomenon’ Category


Perception and manipulation are the skills which leaders of Pakatan Rakyat have long mastered – including to the tok gurus of PAS.

To a newbie in the political platform, PAS may appear to be an innocent Islamic party with adaptable policies to the suit the tastes of their supporters; a rather radical Islamic party to those who want them to be radical and a liberal party to the others.

Those people feel that PAS brings new hope to the corrupted and secular Malaysia. PAS leaders promise a shift into a better Malaysia where Islam shall be implemented into laws and such. Among efforts done to prove their worth, they produce ‘instant ustazahs’ like Abby Abadi, once an actress who was said to suddenly ‘abandoned her fortune’ for a more ‘Islamic way of life’. Her ‘rebranding’ comes hand in hand with a new image; all done to convince people that ‘they can make a change’.

This way, PAS is able to attract those who are naive enough to believe in perception or those who ‘go with the flow’ of the society. They may see PAS as an ideal Islamic Reformist promising them a better nation. The majority of people in this group are the young generations, a lot of them are educated and with their thirst for excitement of some sort, feel that they are smarter than others especially those who do not share their ideologies. The idea of a mass wave of change is enticing to the rebellious blood of the youngsters.

Now that they gain supporters, how do PAS make sure that these people would stay in their grasp?

PAS claims Malaysia to be a secular state and needs to be reformed into an Islamic nation to the some groups but on the other hand only promise a ‘negara berkebajikan’ to the others who oppose the idea of an Islamic state.  They claim that Malaysia is corrupted country. PAS also imply that Malaysia is too westernised to some groups and to the rest they say that the government is sort of too radical in protecting the Malay rights and Islam which is the religion of Malaysia.

The idea spread by the PAS leaders (and the rest in Pakatan Rakyat) is that the leaders of UMNO and Barisan Nasional are too corrupted and selfish. They are so money and power orientated that they would do anything to keep in their power and ruin the country by over spending and implementing bad policies.

And that is why PAS’s supporters felt that they need PAS to govern the nation. PAS tells their supporters never to believe in the obvious but to turn to them in advice. PAS sells the party’s own newspapers that was said to be ‘nothing but the truth’ to counter the ‘lies spread by the government’ in other newspapers. PAS’s supporters feel that the government underestimated them, but they know better. It produces that disgusted feeling of, ‘How dare they think such of me!” which is very influential to youngsters who tend to act first and think later. This planted hatred in the hearts of their supporters and in turn whisper false hopes into their angry souls. Hope for the better; hope for a change, “All you have to do is to join us in our mission and you shall be granted a place in heaven. It shall be a Jihad.”

And unbeknownst to them, they all had been manipulated by the PAS leaders, turning them from innocent supporters to obsessed questers who do not really understand what they are fighting for.

It sounds silly, doesn’t it? Crazy even. “Too crazy to be true – you must be kidding me.”

And that my friends, is the seal that shuts the eyes of their obsessed supporters from any shred of revelation of the truth coming from the outside their circle.

In my next article, I’ll be post a number of videos to prove my point on this matter.

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gempa
A weak earthquake with a magnitude of 2.9 on the Richter scale occurred near Kudat, Sabah at 8:46p.m. yesterday, 21st October 2012. The press statement released by the Malaysian Meteorological Department says that the epicenter of the Earthquake is located at latitude 6.7° North and longitude 116.8° East, 22km South of Kudat and tremors were felt in areas of Kudat.

Click here for the press statement released by the Malaysian Meteorological Department

The last time Malaysia was hit by an earthquake was on the Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 12:44:14 AM, also in Sabah at latitude 4.78 North and longitude 118.32 East, about 75 km Northeast of Tawau with a magnitude of 4.6 on the Richter scale according to US Geological Survery.

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(from SkyandTelescope.com : http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/home/111588359.html)

Mention “meteors,” and casual skywatchers usually think of the annual Perseid shower on display every August.

But the Geminid meteor shower of mid-December ties or even surpasses the Perseids as the year’s richest and most reliable meteor display. Geminid meteors come from 3200 Phaethon, an asteroid discovered in 1983.

This year the Geminids are predicted to peak on the morning of December 14th around 11h UT, more or less. That’s excellent timing for North America, especially out West. The Moon that night is only a day past first quarter and sets around midnight or 1 a.m. local time, depending on where you live. Even before then, on the evening of the 13th, the moonlight isn’t bright enough to dampen the shower’s visibility too much — and the Geminids, with their radiant near Castor and Pollux, pick up steam as early as 8 or 9 p.m. But the radiant is highest around 2 a.m., so the morning hours are the usually the most productive.

Bundle up as warmly as you possibly can, and lie back in a dark spot with an open sky. You may see as many as two meteors a minute on average if you have a very dark sky and are watching after midnight.

If your sky is not too light-polluted, you might try making a careful meteor count and reporting it to the International Meteor Organization. Such counts by amateurs supply much of what we know about meteor showers’ behavior. For your count to be useful, you’ll need to follow the procedures described on our page or at the IMO’s website.

Don’t forget that the shower lasts more than one night. Counts are especially needed on nights away from the maximum, because fewer people are watching. In any case, enjoy the show!

UPDATE:

I’ve realised that many of you are searching for a good place to watch the meteor shower either in Kuala Lumpur or elsewhere in Malaysia. Just look for a dark area with no light source near you (and preferably away from the city’s light pollution) and you could watch them well. According to my previous experience, the best time would be during the morning hours. Not only the shower is at its peak but the city’s light is not as bright as it is before midnight.

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These are the photos of the beautiful rainbow that I snapped the other day… enjoy 😀 (please click on the photos for a larger view at them).

The beautiful rainbow

Do you remember when I told you that the second rainbow was no longer visible when I took out the camera? I was actually wrong! Observe the photo below. It actually has another very faint rainbow above it.

Can you see the second rainbow?

If you cannot find it, have no fear! I’ve edited the photo a little to allow you to see the second rainbow. I had increased the contrast of this photo below by 40% and decrease the brightness by 30%. Look at the photo below.

Can you see the second rainbow now?

I did not realise that the second rainbow was caught on this photograph until just now when I wanted to add it to my blog. Here are  two more photos of the rainbow for you to enjoy.

The second rainbow is also visible on this photo only that it is much, much fainter.

The last photo that I snapped. Even the bright rainbow is fading. I do not think that the other rainbow is still visible on this one though.

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My sisters came running from upstairs yelling, “Rainbow! Rainbow!“. My brother and I excitedly rushed with them out of the front door searching for a rainbow but we found nothing. Actually our father just called to tell us about the rainbow. Thinking that we might get a better view from our bedroom windows, we climbed upstairs but again no rainbow can be seen.

Not willing to give up, we ran past the kitchen (where my mother was anxiously screaming with the fear of us getting burnt) and went straight outside. This time, we’ve been rewarded with not one but two rainbows! One of them is unusually bright that we momentarily gaped in awe.

Hunting for a camera, again we ran past mum since the kitchen is the only entrance to the backyard. Unable to find dad’s new camera (Olympus FE4030), I grabbed dad’s Sony handycam and made my way outside. The second rainbow had now vanished from sight but the first is still amazingly bright. I snapped quite a number of photos and a will show them in my later post

Later, we found out that dad’s Olympus camera was actually with him -click here to view dad’s photos using his Olympus-It was in fact a perfect semi-circle rainbow; like the ones we’ve seen at the Niagara Falls.

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By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent Kate Kelland, Health And Science Correspondent Thu Mar 4, 2:07 pm ET

LONDON (Reuters) – A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades.

A panel of 41 scientists from across the world reviewed 20 years’ worth of research to try to confirm the cause of the so-called Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) extinction, which created a “hellish environment” around 65 million years ago and wiped out more than half of all species on the planet.

Scientific opinion was split over whether the extinction was caused by an asteroid or by volcanic activity in the Deccan Traps in what is now India, where there were a series of super volcanic eruptions that lasted around 1.5 million years.

The new study, conducted by scientists from Europe, the United States, Mexico, Canada and Japan and published in the journal Science, found that a 15-kilometre (9 miles) wide asteroid slamming into Earth at Chicxulub in what is now Mexico was the culprit.

“We now have great confidence that an asteroid was the cause of the KT extinction. This triggered large-scale fires, earthquakes measuring more than 10 on the Richter scale, and continental landslides, which created tsunamis,” said Joanna Morgan of Imperial College London, a co-author of the review.

The asteroid is thought to have hit Earth with a force a billion times more powerful than the atomic bomb at Hiroshima.

Morgan said the “final nail in the coffin for the dinosaurs” came when blasted material flew into the atmosphere, shrouding the planet in darkness, causing a global winter and “killing off many species that couldn’t adapt to this hellish environment.”

Scientists working on the study analyzed the work of paleontologists, geochemists, climate modelers, geophysicists and sedimentologists who have been collecting evidence about the KT extinction over the last 20 years.

Geological records show the event that triggered the dinosaurs’ demise rapidly destroyed marine and land ecosystems, they said, and the asteroid hit “is the only plausible explanation for this.”

Peter Schulte of the University of Erlangen in Germany, a lead author on the study, said fossil records clearly show a mass extinction about 65.5 million years ago — a time now known as the K-Pg boundary.

Despite evidence of active volcanism in India, marine and land ecosystems only showed minor changes in the 500,000 years before the K-Pg boundary, suggesting the extinction did not come earlier and was not prompted by eruptions.

The Deccan volcano theory is also thrown into doubt by models of atmospheric chemistry, the team said, which show the asteroid impact would have released much larger amounts of sulphur, dust and soot in a much shorter time than the volcanic eruptions could have, causing extreme darkening and cooling.

Gareth Collins, another co-author from Imperial College, said the asteroid impact created a “hellish day” that signaled the end of the 160-million-year reign of the dinosaurs, but also turned out to be a great day for mammals.

“The KT extinction was a pivotal moment in Earth’s history, which ultimately paved the way for humans to become the dominant species on Earth,” he wrote in a commentary on the study.

(Collins has created a website at http://impact.ese.ic.ac.uk/ImpactEffects/Chicxulub.html which allows readers to see the effects of the asteroid impact.)

(Editing by Myra MacDonald)

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I found this article linked from Yahoo.com and thought of sharing it with all of you. The article was taken from news.discovery.com. To see it in its original web page, click here.

Per-Arne-Mikalsen2The mystery shape in the aurora over Andenes, Norway (photograph by Per-Arne Mikalsen)


On Jan. 20, 2010, Per-Arne Mikalsen was photographing a vast aurora erupting over the northern Norwegian town of Andenes.

Because solar activity is on the increase, aurora spotters have many opportunities to see the Northern Lights. On this particular night the aurora was intense, stretching toward the southern latitudes of Norway.

In one of the photographs taken by Mikalsen was an “object” that couldn’t be identified. Although Mikalsen had taken several images at the same location, just one photo showed a mysterious green parachute-like object hanging with the main aurora. (This time, it appears that the Russian military was not involved in the making of this strange shape in the sky.)

At first it seemed easy to dismiss the object as a lens flare or a spot on the camera lens, but after further study it became clear that the answer wasn’t that simple.

Per-Arne-Mikalsen1 The mystery shape in the aurora over Andenes, Norway, wider angle (photograph by Per-Arne Mikalsen)

Also, Mikalsen is no stranger to aurorae, having worked on Andøya Rocket Range (on the island of Andøya) for many years. He’s seen aurorae of all shapes and sizes, but he’d never before seen a structure like this hanging in the sky.

“I have been working the Andøya Rocket Range for 25 years (the 20 last years in the management) and I have become more and more fascinated by the aurora,” Mikalsen told Discovery News. “Photography is a hobby for me.”

According to Mikalsen, as soon as he posted his aurora photographs on the Spaceweather.com Northern Lights Gallery, he received dozens of emails from all over the world requesting more information about the mysterious shape.

So what could it be? In correspondence with Truls Lynne Hansen, lead scientist at the Tromsø Geophysical Observatory, he doubts that the mystery object can be explained by a technical fault.

“Usually such aberrations appear when there is a small and intense source of light in the field of view, or at least so close that the light from it hits the lens,” Hansen explained to me via email. “That seems not to be the case here.”

“Additionally the color of the ‘phenomenon’ is the same as the color in the aurora, the auroral green line from atomic oxygen,” Hansen continued, “so the ‘phenomenon’ is either a genuine auroral feature or a reflection of auroral light somewhere in space.”

Hold on. A reflection of auroral light… in space? That’s impossible.

Or is it?

Diagrama_iridium_flare_grande
How an Iridium flare works with sunlight, but the same should be true for other light sources, such as aurorae (astrosat.net)

The structured shape of the phenomenon, plus its distance from any light sources, seems to indicate that this isn’t an equipment problem. There is also no known aurora that could do this naturally. So that leaves the “reflection from space” argument. What do we have in space that could possibly reflect the green light being emitted by the aurora?

“I agree with Pål Brekke [Senior Advisor at the Norwegian Space Centre] that a reflection from a satellite is a candidate,” said Hansen. “It reminds of the so-called ‘Iridium flares’ — reflections of sunlight from the regularly shaped Iridium satellites.”

Satellite flares are well known by astronomers. As a satellite passes overhead, the conditions may be right for the spacecraft’s solar panels or antennae to reflect sunlight down to the ground. The result is a short-lived burst of light, known as a “flare.”

The network of Iridium communication satellites are best known for their flares, since they have three huge door-sized antennae that act as orbital mirrors. Witnessing an Iridium flare is immensely rewarding; the event can be predicted beforehand because these satellites have orbits that can be tracked.

My personal concern about the satellite flare theory is the question about auroral light intensity. Is the light from a large aurora bright enough to bounce off a satellite and appear as an auroral satellite flare as a point? And in turn produce a parachute-shaped, lens flare-like projection in the photo? I couldn’t imagine even an Iridium satellite amplifying auroral light that much (although a stonking-huge orbital solar power array of the future might do a better job).

“The intensity of an intense aurora is not far from the intensity of moonlight, which is 1/100,000 of sun’s light, and the solar Iridium flares apparently are several orders of magnitude stronger than this ‘auroral flare,’ so the intensity does not immediately exclude the satellite reflection hypothesis,” said Hansen.

A weak auroral flare seems feasible, but as pointed out by astronomer Daniel Fischer via Twitter, the green flare might not have anything to do with reflected aurora light, it could just be the color of the lens coating. The lens flare was therefore the result of internal reflections inside the camera lens caused by the bright lights in the lower left-hand corner of the frame.

“It has the typical caustic shape and it is opposite several bright point lights,” Fischer observed. “Green color could be caused by lens coatings.”

Although more research will need to be done, it certainly seems plausible that Per-Arne Mikalsen serendipitously took a photograph of a satellite flare (possibly an Iridium satellite). What makes this revelation even more exciting is that we’ve never seen an auroral reflection from a satellite before (if it’s not a lens flare, that is). “I have, by the way, never seen or heard of a similar phenomenon,” Hansen said.

If you want to see a bigger version of the phototgraph, please click here. Believe me, the bigger version is just marvellous!

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