Cartoon – My hair


My mother, my little brother and I love to draw. My mother and I really enjoy visiting art shops, we can spend hours looking at the wonderful arrays of professional art materials like paints, colour pencils, pastels, brushes, graphite pencils, charcoals and others. The best part about sharing a hobby with our parents is that we’ll have the luxury of using different mediums of professional quality for our drawings.

I also enjoy drawing cartoon for my siblings. Most were based on our little plays and jokes. I started drawing comics or simple cartoons either to ‘document’ wonderful moments that we shared or to amuse my siblings. I draw the characters in stick figures because whenever I tried to add meat and bones, my drawings turns out awkward. It is true that there’s no specific rule to cartoon drawing and one can exaggerate as much as one wish but simple cartoon saves a lot of time too. According to my mother, my cartoon characters are somehow alive; something which I cannot create with a proper human drawing.

Here is the one that I drew a few months back telling the story of my hair. I did not intend to post it on my blog because I never think that my cartoons are good enough to be shown to other people but my mother ‘made’ me post it for she said that it is really good and the comic really made her laugh. My mother also said that by gaining the confidence, I may be able to draw better in the future.

*Note: Kanillia is a cat living at the back of our house. The second drawing shows Khanillia pulling my hair with its claws.

I hope that I manage to make somebody smile 🙂 Kindly give some feedbacks on my cartoon and I would really appreciate useful tips and comments so that I can improve myself.

Birthdays in March – mum’s and mine


Both mum and I not only have our birthdays in March but also in the same week. I am 16 this year, Alhamdulillah, and my family members had given me wonderful presents.

Mum gave me a lot of her Australian, American, Canadian and New Zealand stamps wrapped in a lovely silver coloured box. My dad bought me stamps at the stamp fair and an A3 sized document file which I now use to keep my stamps in. My sister Aeshah gave me some Vietnamese stamps featuring dolphins that are missing from my collection and lots of odds and ends that I could use for my craftworks. Anisah gave me a number of her drawings and Ali gave me a hairdryer, a ‘Snoopy’ clock and a watch.

My parents gave me a beautiful birthday card with a picture of a flower drawn by mum (the artist), using soft pastels. Ahmad Ali gave me three birthday cards for he enjoyed card making so much that he couldn’t stop making them… Abang Muhammad sent me a birthday card too, all the way from Chicago together with lots of gorgeous U.S.S.R. stamps.

My mother had a marvellous birthday too. Again, most of her presents were stamps from all of us. I secretly looked through her stamp albums and picked out stamps that I own but is missing from her collection. I’m delighted that she was thrilled to receive the stamps that I gave her. I also gave her some Machin stamps (the British definitive stamps with a picture of Queen Elizabeth’s head – mum simply love them, she has a few pages of those lovely stamps in her stamp album and wishes to own as much as she could). Aeshah gave her stamps too. Anisah gave her an envelope with a picture of a cat that she ‘bought’ for 6 stars (our play-money currency) from my little brother.  And Ahmad Ali gave mum a beautiful egg cup and a special Machin stamp(the 1840 Anniversary Machins) with pictures of both Queen Elizabeth as in other Machin stamps and Queen Victoria as in Penny Black.

That night,we had pizzas from Domino’s Pizza for our dinner. Everyone love Domino’s Pizza and we celebrated most of our birthdays with them. It was only last month when we had pizza for my little brother’s birthday!

Blue Chrysanthemums?


The beautiful blue chrysanthemums... aren't they lovely?

It is now no longer a problem for anybody (especially florists) to obtain fresh flowers of any colour they wished for. There is now a technique of dyeing white flowers to other colours; be it pink, blue, black, green or purple.

I remember conducting an experiment when I was in Primary 1. We placed white flowers into a beaker of diluted red food colouring. After a while, the flowers had tints of red on the tips of their petals. Later, we saw that almost the whole flowers had turned red. We then cut the stalks of the flowers and found out that they were red too. We even ‘created’ a mixed-coloured flowers by dividing  the stems and place them in separate jars of dye.

Last Sunday, I came home from Kak Tasneem’s kenduri (click here to learn more about kenduri’ and click here to read about Kak Tasneem’s kenduri) with a bouquet of blue chrysanthemum for Nenek (my grandmother). I showed the flowers to nenek and she stared at them in wonder. She was really amazed by the flowers! She told me that she had never seen blue chrysanthemums before.

Blue chrysanthemums in a vase

Anyway we later found out that the chrysanthemums were actually dyed! As soon as we reached home, I arranged the flowers in a transparent vase and to my surprise, the water turned into a faint shade of blue after 5 minutes. Then, the eczema on my hands became very itchy and rashes appeared as I am allergic to some chemicals like artificial colourings. After replacing the water for four times within 41 hours, the colour of the chrysanthemums are no longer a striking blue but had toned down into a softer shade. Nevertheless, the water were still blue everytime I changed it.

The water is blue although I had changed it about 5 times when the photo was snapped

It is amazing how we can ‘colour’ our flowers into any colours of our choice. It would definitely  be a fun project for kids to enjoy.

Note: All of the flowers in these photos had their colours toned down to a softer blue. Click here to see the original colours of the flowers.