Trengganuspeak


Yesterday my little brother, Ahmad Ali asked dad if it will still rhymes if he change the wording in the ‘Pussy Cat’ poem to…

Pussy cat, pussy cat,
Where have you been,
I’ve been to London,
To see Awang Goneng.

Dad laughed and said yes it’ll rhymes perfectly but only if we read it in Trengganuspeak…

Pussy cat, pussy cat,
Where have you beeng,
I’ve beeng to Londeng,
To see Awang Goneng.

I wonder what Uncle Awang Goneng will say if he hears this ‘new’ nursery rhyme. We all had a very good laugh except for my poor little brother who can’t understand Trengganuspeak.

Trengganuspeak reminds me of Budu Spell (page 247-GUIT by Uncle AG). Mum said that it was so funny that she couldn’t stop laughing. I read it but I didn’t find it that funny until mum read it for me in the original Trengganuspeak. Only then I started laughing comparing budu (a type of sauce) to anak bbudu (tadpoles)!

Mum then asked me a question that I was not able to answer (and honestly I’m still confused about it- had to check with mama). What is the different between…

  1. Awang makang kambing; and
  2. Awang makang kkambing.

In Bahasa Malaysia both sentences spelt makan wrongly and looks the same; only in the second > the kambing (goat) was spelt wrongly; but in Trengganuspeak it means:-

  1. Awang eats (a) goat (mutton)
  2. Awang was eaten by (a) goat!

Wow!!! And I still can’t pronounce the word ‘buah khadeh’ right till this moment!

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4 thoughts on “Trengganuspeak

  1. Aiman,

    Kha sounds like kho as in jawi, arabic.
    but in case of khadeh, kho is quite shallow…

    Landeng would be better spelt i guess?

  2. shall i share with you my grandson’s favorite nursery rhyme…
    but of course he doesnt sing yet…only 6 month old now.

    ingcy wingcy spider
    climbing up the spouk
    down came the raing
    that wash the spider ouk

    ouk came the sung
    that dried up all the raing
    ingcy wingcy spider
    climbing up againg

  3. Why not try these sentences:

    1. Yesterday I saw a man eating seahorse (pretend you just heard the sentence)

    It could either means:

    Yesterday I saw a man eating a seahorse

    or

    Yesterday I saw a man-eating seahorse (a seahorse big enough to be able to eat a man)

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